How To Keep Cats Off Motorcycle Seats


How To Keep Cats Off Motorcycle Seats

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If your in a power struggle with your cat or your neighbors cat over your motorcycle, you need solutions. In this post we’ll give you some humane suggestions on how to keep cats off motorcycle seats and keep it undamaged.

 

You prize your motorcycle. You love your cat. But never the twain should meet. Your beloved kitty has plenty of soft, cushiony places to take her siesta. Seriously, can’t she let you have one place to call your own?!

Considering the negative effects of all those claws, hair, and not to mention urine, she doesn’t belong on your motorcycle seat.

And what about the neighbors cats? If you don’t have control over your own cat, you have even less control over them!

Your cat needs places around your home to scratch, to curl up, and most definitely to urinate. To deter her from using your motorcycle seat (or any other inappropriate area of your home) for these things, it is incumbent upon you to provide enough convenient and fitting spots for your cat to do all of these things.

A good start is garaging your motorcycle (or some other covering), making your motorcycle seat undesirable, redirecting her attention to other areas, or training her to go elsewhere.

 

How to keep cats off motorcycle seats

Considering the damage a cat can do to them, your motorcycle seat and other areas of your home should be off limits to your cat.

The best ways to keep a cat off of your motorcycle seat is to:

  • Store your motorcycle in a garage, shed or other enclosed location or use a motorcycle cover.
  • Make your motorcycle seat an pleasant place.
  • Use home remedies and natural cat deterrents.

 

Keep your cat away
Naturally, the most effective means of keeping your cat away from your motorcycle and other off-limits areas around your property is to close them off completely. If at all possible, keep your motorcycle in a garage. Additionally, since often it’s not your cat that’s the culprit, this is also the best way to keep neighborhood cats that don’t care where they urinate off your bike. If this isn’t feasible, cover it with a tarp or plastic cover that is cat-claw impenetrable. A clear plastic cover can also work to keep your cat off furniture and out of other areas of your home where your cat doesn’t belong.

 

Make it an undesirable experience
There are several things you can place on your motorcycle seat that will deter your cat from getting on it. Wrapping it in tin foil works because cats hate the sound and feel of it. Plus, it’s easy for you to take off and put back on before and after a ride. Try also sprinkling black pepper or covering the seat with double-sided tape for its sticky texture.

 

Redirect your cat’s attention
Redirect your cat’s attention away from your motorcycle seat and other areas of your home where you don’t want her by creating snuggly spots elsewhere. Cats love cozy places to curl up, and they love to scratch. If you create a place in your home that incorporates all the things she loves including a super comfy bed and an irresistible scratching post, she’ll be enticed toward this area and away from your motorcycle seat.

 

Train your cat to go elsewhere
Training your cat is a necessity, so include in her training methods that will keep her off your motorcycle seat and other undesirable areas. Combine training with an unpleasant experience by using deterrents such as pet alarms that emit sound she hates or motion-activated devices that send her away with unpleasant air puffs. Or you can try the Pavlov’s Dog effect by squirting her with a water pistol each time she heads for your motorcycle seat.

cat riding on a motorcycle

 

Cat deterrent home remedies

Like other animals, cats have the things they hate to encounter. Use any of these things to deter them from areas where you don’t want them. Water, unpleasant scents, chicken wire, certain plants, and other cat repellent home remedies are all effective at keeping cats out of places where your don’t want them to be.

 

Water

One of the most effective means of keeping your cat and the neighbors’ cats out of your garden, off your motorcycle seat, and out of other areas on your property you don’t want them is water. Cats hate being wet, which is one of the reasons they lick themselves. The action of licking their fur actually dries them off more quickly than if they air dry. Squirting a cat with water may not sound like a nice thing to do, but if it means keeping your kitty safe from areas of your garden or other spots that could cause them harm, don’t hesitate to do it.

 

Unpleasant scents

Cats hate certain odors. Among these are citrus, cayenne pepper, lavender, citronella, rosemary, and ammonia. Cut up peels from oranges or other citrus fruits and leave them about your yard in areas you don’t want your cat to go. However, don’t use citrus scents on your motorcycle seat because these are a magnet for bees. You can also try sprinkling cayenne pepper or placing citronella candles in those areas to deter cats from urinating or scratching in those spots.

 

Chicken wire and certain plants

If you need to keep your cats away from your garden, lay chicken wire atop the soil or as a surrounding fence in order to deter your cat from frolicking there. Cats also hate certain plants such as lavender and rosemary. Consider planting these to keep discourage your cat from trampling there. But be careful of plants and other things that can be toxic to pets. Refer below to ‘Smells that deter cats from urinating.’

 

Home-remedy cat repellents

Some of the scents and substances cats hate make great repellents that are unpleasant but not harmful to your cat. These are two of the simplest of home remedies to repel cats.

1. Vinegar, water, and hand soap: In equal portions, pour 1 part white vinegar and 1 part water (can be tap, bottled, or filtered) into a glass or plastic spray bottle and shake well. Be sure to fill no more than two thirds full. Then add in 1 part liquid hand soap. (Clear hand soap works best.) Shake well. Spray this mixture on areas you need to deter your cat from going. Since there’s no need to saturate, you can use a cloth to dab it over these areas. Can be used both indoors and outdoors.

2. Citronella oil and water: Fill a glass spray bottle with water nearly to the top. (Glass is best here because oil will break down in plastic bottles.) Add about 20 drops of citronella oil to the bottle, shake well, and spray in both indoor and outdoor areas to deter cats. Be sure to reapply after a rain.

cat with goggles

Smells that deter cats from urinating

As has already been established, there are several scents cats hate, and any of these can make great cat repellents. However, be careful not to use too much of some of those on this list because too much can be toxic, causing liver damage. These scents include:

Citrus: Cats hate anything that smells or tastes citrusy, including such fruits as lemons, limes, and oranges. That’s why dabbing a little of these scents around the house or garden can be a great repellant. Be careful, though, since citrus can attract bees. Is it toxic to your kitty? No.

Wintergreen and other mints: Wintergreen and other minty scents and tastes are particularly hated by cats. Soak tissues or cotton balls with a little minty oil and dab it on areas you need to deter cats from going. Be careful, though. Wintergreen and other mints can be toxic to cats if ingested. For this reason, you may want to go in a different direction to find a cat repellent.

Menthol: Menthol is much like mint—cats hate it, but it can be toxic if they ingest it.

Rue: Rue (or Ruta graveolens) is an herb. Cats hate it, and it’s not toxic to them, so you can use it as a repellent without worry.

Rosemary and cinnamon: So too are rosemary and cinnamon herbs that cats hate and are not toxic to your kitty cat.

Lavender: Lavender is another plant scent that cats hate. However, this one is toxic to your little buddy. It can cause liver damage, and it can be fatal. So you may want to forego the use of it altogether.

Eucalyptus: Yes, cats hate it, and for good reason. According to the ASPCA (American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), eucalyptus is highly toxic to cats and other domestic animals. In fact, it’s considered a poison. If your cat or other beloved pet has ingested it, call your nearest poison control center immediately.

 

Motorcycle seat repair tips

Vinyl and leather repair kit: For rips and tears in your vinyl or leather motorcycle seat there are a number of already-prepared kits available at your local auto supply store, motorcycle supply store, or box store such as Loews or Walmart. Always follow enclosed instructions for best results. Here is a good quick guide how to repair a motorcycle seat.

Leather repair or leather touch-up kit: For rips and tears on other furniture such as sofas and chairs, box stores and furniture stores offer various repair kits. These kits work best because they include everything needed and instructions on how to repair damage.

Replacing a damaged motorcycle seat: If damaged beyond repair, you may need to replace the seat altogether. Gather replacement seat cover, 3/8” staples and staple gun, measuring tape, scissors or other cutting instrument, and screwdriver. First, remove the seat cover with screwdriver. Next, measure the seat and cut the material accordingly. Then stretch the material over the seat, gather it taut in the rear, and staple securely. Staple your way around the remainder of the seat cover, and trim off excess material. Be sure to staple close to the foam in order to keep it taut.

Your cat is important to your and your family, but you also love your motorcycle. But that doesn’t mean it’s okay for your cat to destroy your motorcycle seat. Keep your cat away from your motorcycle and other areas where you don’t want her by using any of these tried-and-true methods. You and your cat will both be happier.

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